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TRUCKING REGULATIONS


Alabama Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Montgomery may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Alabama Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Alabama laws that affect trucks operating only in Alabama :

Accident Reporting:

Alabama has adopted the entirety of 49 CFR 390. A truck company must report any significant accident immediately to local law enforcement, within 24 hours to the Public service Commission if a fatal crash or 15 days if non-fatal, and also within 30 days to the Director of Public Safety.

Driver Qualification:

Alabama has adopted the entirety of 49 CFR 391.

However, some exceptions may apply. For example, the 21 year old age requirement can be lowered to 18 if the driver obtains a waiver. The under 21 driver must not haul hazardous waste. It must be in a straight truck less than 26,000 pounds.

Drivers may obtain waivers for certain vision restrictions and diabetes.

Log Requirements:

Alabama has adopted 49 CFR 395, with one notable difference. The federal regulation requires the carrier to maintain the log books for 6 months. Alabama requires 12 months.

Insurance Required:

The federal insurance requirements for interstate carriers are much higher than the state’s. Alabama requires $100,000 per person/$300,000 per accident in liability insurance; $50,000 for property damage.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Public Safety
Accident Records
P.O. Box 1471
Montgomery , AL 36102

If you have been involved in a truck accident in Alabama, click here for more information or to ask any questions you have.

In the event this material is not deemed to fully comply with the provisions of the rules of professional conduct of any particular state, this firm will not accept clients or representation that derive from the distribution of this material within those jurisdictions.

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Alaska Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Fairbanks may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Alaska Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Alaska laws that affect trucks operating only in Alaska :

Driver Qualification:

Alaska has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations. However,some exceptions may apply. For example, the minimum age to qualify to operate a vehicle in intrastate commerce is 19.

A driver employed before April 1, 1992 , is qualified to drive a motor vehicle in intrastate commerce even if that person would not meet the medical standards due to a preexisting medical condition. A physician must determine that the condition has not gotten significantly worse or that another non-qualifying medical condition has not manifested.

Recording and Reporting of Accidents:

Alaska has adopted Part 390 of the Federal Regulations, which includes accident record keeping requirements. A driver involved in an accident resulting in injury, death, or over $501.00 in property damage must notify the police immediately. An accident report must be filed with the department of public safety within 10 days after the accident.

Any driver involved in an accident must file proof of insurance by use of a “Certificate of Insurance” form to comply with mandatory insurance law.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Administration
Driver Services
2760 Sherwood Lane , Suite B

Juneau , AK

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Arkansas Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Little Rock may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Arkansas Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Arkansas laws that affect trucks operating only in Arkansas :

Driver Qualification:

Arkansas has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with the exception of Sec. 391.11(b)(1) for intrastate drivers, which states that the drivers must be at least 21 years of age. In Arkansas they can be 18.

Hours of Service:

Arkansas has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with one exception. The maximum driving and on-duty requirements do not apply to intrastate commodities or farm supplies for agricultural purposes if the transportation is limited to an area within a 100-air-mile radius from the source of the commodities or distribution point for the farm supplies when such transportation occurs during planting and harvesting seasons.

Crash reports are available from:

Arkansas State Police
Attn. Accident Records
One State Police Plaza Drive
Little Rock, AR 72209
(501) 618-8130

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Arizona Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Phoenix may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Arizona Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Arizona laws that affect trucks operating only in Arizona :

Driver Qualification:

Arizona has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with the exception of Secs 391.1 (b)(1), 391.68, and 391.69. The physical qualification requirements also contain special provisions. However, the driver of an intrastate-operating tow truck with a GVWR of up to 26,000 pounds is exempt from part 391 with the exception of Secs. 391.41, 391.43, 391.45, 391.47, and 391.45.

Driving of Motor Vehicles:

Arizona has adopted Part 392 of the Federal Regulations. However, Part 392 was not adopted fro an intrastate-operating tow truck that has GVWR or up to 26,000 pounds.

Recording and Reporting of Accidents:

Arizona has adopted Part 390, which includes accident record keeping requirements.  One notable difference, however, is that Part 390 was not adopted for an intrastate-operating tow truck that has a GVWR of up to 26,000 pounds.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Public Safety
ATTN: Department Records Unit

P.O. Box 6638
Phoenix , AZ 85005

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California Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Sacramento may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The California Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of California laws that affect trucks operating only in California :

Driver Qualification:

In order to be employed as a driver for compensation in California , one must be at least 18 years old, and 21 years old to haul hazardous materials or to be engaged in interstate commerce.

Hours of Service:

Interstate drivers as well as drivers transporting hazardous wastes or hazardous substances are subject to the same regulations as found in Title 49, Part 395 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

Drivers not required to follow the Federal Regulations are not permitted to drive more than 12 hours, or drive after having been working for 15 hours, following 8 hours of being off duty.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of California Highway Patrol
Information Services Unit/SWITRS
P.O. Box 942898
Sacramento , CA 94298

(916) 375-2850

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Colorado Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Boulder may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Colorado Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Colorado laws that affect trucks operating only in Colorado :

Driver Qualifications:

Colorado has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with a few modifications. For example, any person not meeting the physical qualification requirements of Sec. 391.43 can apply with the Colorado State Patrol, Motor Carrier Safety Section for a waiver.

Hours of Service:

Colorado has adopted the entirety of Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with a few exceptions. For example, Section 395.3 is not applicable to governmental and public utility drivers working an emergency, as defined in Sec 390.5, provided that drivers continue to comply with Sec. 395.1(e)(5) or Sec. 395.8 recording their hours of service. The motor carrier must document this local emergency.

Parts and Accessories:

Colorado has adopted the entirety of Part 393 of the Federal Regulations with some differences. One notable exception is that Sec. 393.48 and Sec. 393.49 do not apply to trailers that have hydraulic surge breaks if the GCWR 26,000 pounds and they comply with the other rules concerning surge breaks in Colorado .

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Revenue
Motor Vehicle Business Group
Traffic Records Station
1881 Pierce St. Room 162
Lakewood, Co 80214
(303) 205-5613

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Connecticut Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Stanford may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Connecticut Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Connecticut laws that affect trucks operating only in Connecticut :

Driver Qualification:

Connecticut has adopted part 391 of the Federal Regulations with the exception of Sec. 391.11(b)(1) which states that an intrastate driver must be at least 21 years old. In Connecticut , a driver not transporting hazardous materials may be 18.

Hours of Service:

Connecticut has adopted Part 395 for intrastate vehicles with a gross combination weight rating of over 18,000 pounds or transporting hazardous materials requiring placards. However, Section 395.3 won’t apply to a public service company vehicle providing assistance during a major loss of utility service.

Vehicle Marking/Identification:

Connecticut has adopted Sec. 390.21 of the Federal Regulations.

Intrastate vehicles have to display the name or trade name of the motor carrier and a Connecticut issued US DOT number followed by the letters CT.

Crash reports are available from:

Connecticut State Police
Attn. Reports & Records

P.O. Box 2794
Middletown, CT 06457-9294
(860) 685-8403

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Delaware Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Dover may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Delaware Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Delaware laws that affect trucks operating only in Delaware :

Driver Qualification:

Delaware has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with a few notable differences. Drivers must be at least 18 and have at least 1 year of previous experience operating a motor vehicle. Drivers transporting hazardous materials and/or involved in intrastate commerce must be 21.

Loads:

Delaware has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations, including regulations dealing with projecting and shifting or falling loads. Vehicles that are driven or moved on any highway must be constructed or loaded to prevent the contents from dropping, sifting, leaking, or otherwise escaping from the vehicle.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Public Safety
ATTN: Traffic Records
P.O. Box 430
Dover , DE 19903
(302) 739-5933

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Florida Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Okeechobee may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Florida Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Florida laws that affect trucks operating only in Florida :

Driver Qualification:

Florida has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with a few notable differences. Florida does not comply with Sec. 391.11(b)(1) for intrastate drivers not transporting hazardous materials, which states that such drivers must be at least 21 years of age. In Florida , these drivers may be 18.

A driver who operates a commercial motor vehicle having a declared gross vehicle weight of less than 26,000 pounds solely intrastate is not required to comply with the provisions of Part 391.

Hours of Service:

Florida has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with the exception of Secs.395(a) and (b) for intrastate drivers not transporting hazardous materials.

A driver operating a commercial motor vehicle with a declared gross vehicle weight of less than 26,000 pounds and not transporting hazardous materials with the exception of petroleum products does not need to comply with Part 395.

Loads:

Florida has adopted Part 393 of Federal Regulations, including regulations dealing with projecting, shifting, or falling loads. However, the provisions requiring covering and securing the load with an appropriate cover don’t apply to vehicles carrying agricultural products locally where the speed limit is less than 65 and the distance driven is less than 20 miles.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles
Division of Florida Highway Patrol

Traffic Homicide and Record Section
Neil Kirkman Building
Tallahassee , FL 32399

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Georgia Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Concord may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Georgia Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Georgia laws that affect trucks operating only in New Hampshire :

Driver Qualification:

Georgia has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with some exceptions. See state site on minimum age for transporting non-hazardous materials; for hazardous materials, and drivers operating interstate.

If a person is not physically qualified to drive a commercial motor vehicle due to a physical deficiency, he can seek to have a waiver granted from the state of Georgia .

Georgia observes all other federal laws that apply to over-the-road trucks without exception.

Crash reports are available from:

Georgia   
Georgia Department of Public Safety MVR Unit

Post Office Box 1456
Atlanta , Georgia 30371-2303

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Hawaii Truck Accidents

Crash reports are available from:

Hawaii    

Hawaii Motor Vehicle and Licensing Division
1031 Nuuanu Avenue
Honolulu , Hawaii 96817

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Idaho Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Moscow may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Idaho Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Idaho laws that affect trucks operating only in Idaho :

Driver Qualification:

Idaho has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with some exceptions. The minimum age for intrastate commercial vehicle drivers is 18; interstate drivers must be 21 years old.

Driving of Motor Vehicles:

Idaho has adopted the entirety of Part 392 of the Federal Regulations. The speed limit is 75mph on designated interstates, 65 mph on designated interstates for vehicles with five or more axles operating at a gross weight of more than 26,000 pounds, and 65mph or less on state highways.

Crash reports are available from:

Idaho Transportation Department
Office of Highway Safety

P.O. Box 7129
Boise , ID 83707
(208) 334-8699

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Illinois Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Cicero may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Illinois Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Illinois laws that affect trucks operating only in Illinois :

Driver Qualification:

Illinois has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with a few notable exceptions. For example, a commercial operator must only be at least 18 years old, rather than 21.

The physical qualification requirements also contain special provisions. Illinois law permits insulin dependent diabetics and drivers with vision problems to continue to drive if they were doing so prior to July 29 th, 1986 .

Hours of Service:

Illinois has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with a few differences. For instance, a driver is exempt from recording his duty status if he is within a 150-air-mile radius of the normal work reporting location. It was revised from a 100-air-mile radius.

Agricultural movements by motor vehicles are exempt from the hours of service requirements during planting and harvesting seasons.

Vehicle Marking/Identification:

Illinois has not adopted Sec. 390.21 of the Federal Regulations for intrastate vehicles.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Transportation
Accident Report Office
3215 Executive Park Dr.
Springfield , IL 62766
(217) 782-4518

Indiana Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Gary may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Indiana Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Indiana laws that affect trucks operating only in Indiana :

Hours of Service:

Indiana has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with two notable differences. In Indiana , Part 395 does not apply to farm trucks or vehicles operated in intrastate construction. Also, the maximum driving and on-duty requirements don’t apply to intrastate transporters of agricultural commodities or farm supplies for agricultural purposes if the transportation is limited to an area within a 100 air mile radius from the distribution point for the supplies.

Inspection and Maintenance:

Indiana had adopted Part 396 of the Federal Regulations with one notable exception. Private carriers of property operated only in intrastate commerce or any carriers of property operated only in intrastate commerce while employed in the construction industry are not required to report in writing concerning the condition of the parts and accessories of their vehicle.

Crash Reports are available from:

Indiana State Police
Vehicle Crash Records Section
301 Indiana Government Center North
100 North Senate Ave.
Indianapolis , IN 46204

(317) 232-8286

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Iowa Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Lost Nation may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Iowa Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Iowa laws that affect trucks operating only in Iowa :

Driver Qualification:

Iowa has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with some exceptions. Drivers of commercial vehicles in Iowa must only be 18 years old unless they are transporting hazardous materials, in which case, they must be 21. Federal law mandates that drivers be a minimum of 21 years of age.

Drivers must meet the Federal vision requirements (Sec. 391.41(b)(10)), unless exempted by state law.

Driving of Motor Vehicles:

In Iowa , when involved in an accident a driver must stop and give aid to anyone injured. Failure to do so could result in a fine or jail. A police officer must be contacted immediately.

Drivers cannot carry a concealed firearm unless the weapons are unloaded and either in the trunk of the vehicle or in a closed container which is too large to be effectively concealed.

Inspection and Maintenance:

Iowa has adopted Part 396 of the Federal Regulations. Special plated farm vehicles (intrastate) are exempt from the annual inspection requirement.

Crash reports are available from:

Records Section
Office of Driver Services
Department of Transportation
Park Fair Mall

100 Euclid
P.O. Box 9204
Des Moines, Iowa 50306

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Kansas Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Topeka may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Kansas Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Kansas laws that affect trucks operating only in Kansas :

Driver Qualification:

Kansas has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with a few notable differences. According to Federal Regulations, drivers must be at least 21 years of age. In Kansas , 18 years is the minimum age for drivers working for public carriers. There are a few exceptions in which 16-year-olds can operate commercial vehicles for contract or private motor carriers.

Hours of Service:

Kansas has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with the exception of Secs. 395.1(h), (i), and (k). The maximum driving and on-duty requirements don’t apply to intrastate transporters of agricultural commodities or farm supplies if the transportation is limited to an area within a 100-air-mile radius from the source of the commodities or distribution point for the supplies.

Recording and Reporting of Accidents:

Kansas has adopted Part 390 of the Federal Regulations, which includes accident recordkeeping requirements, in its entirety. Any driver of a vehicle involved in an accident resulting in the injury or death of another person must report the accident immediately by the quickest means of communication.

Crash reports are available from:

Kansas Highway Patrol
Attention: Accident Records
122 SW 7 th Street
Topeka , KS 66603
(785) 296-7400

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Kentucky Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Lexington may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Kentucky Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Kentucky laws that affect trucks operating only in Kentucky :

Driver Qualification:

Kentucky has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with modifications to the age requirement and medical waivers. Intrastate drivers must be at least 18 years old except for transporters of hazardous materials and school bus drivers who must be 21.

Medical waivers in addition to those allowed in Sec. 391.49 are allowed for drivers exclusively in intrastate commerce.

Hours of Service:

Kentucky has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with two notable differences. Utility companies while operating in intrastate commerce only are exempt from the maximum and on-duty hours in Sec. 395.3 during an emergency which requires their employees to work to restore service.

The maximum driving and on-duty requirements don’t apply to intrastate drivers transporting agricultural commodities or farm supplies if the transportation is limited to an area within a 100-air-mile radius from the source of the commodities or distribution point for the farm supplies.

Parts and Accessories:

Kentucky has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations with one notable difference. Private carriers engaged in intrastate farm-to-market agricultural operations only aren’t required to comply with the lighting device requirements in Part 393, Subpart B when driving during daylight hours.

Crash reports are available from:

Kentucky State Police
Records Section
1250 Louisville Rd.
Frankfort KY 40601
(502) 227-8700

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Louisiana Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Baton Rouge may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Louisiana Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Louisiana laws that affect trucks operating only in Louisiana :

Driver Qualification:

Louisiana has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with the exception of Sec. 391.11(b)(1) for intrastate drivers. If a driver has been regularly employed by a motor carrier for a continuous period of no less that three years immediately prior to January 20, 1988 , the driver isn’t required to comply with Secs. 391.21, 391.23, and 391.33.

Intrastate drivers must me 21 years old to haul hazardous materials, and 18 years old to haul all other materials.

How to obtain accident reports:

Send a request in writing accompanied by the required fee to the Traffic Records Unit. Include the name of the drivers along with the date, time, and location of the accident.

Crash reports are available from:

Office of State Police
Traffic Records Unit
P.O. Box 66614
Baton Rouge , LA 70896

(225) 925-6157

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Maine Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Bangor may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Maine Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Maine laws that affect trucks operating only in Maine :

Driver Qualification:

Maine has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with some exceptions. Intrastate motor carriers operating less than 100 air miles from their regular place of business and not hauling hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placarding, are exempt from Part 391.

Intrastate drivers must be at least 18 years old to drive beyond a 100-air-mile radius, and at least 21 years old to haul hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placarding.

Hours of Service:

Maine has adopted Part 390 of the Federal Regulations with one notable difference. Intrastate motor carriers operating less than 100 air miles from their place of business, and not hauling hazardous materials requiring placarding, are exempt from Part 395.

Loads:

Maine has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations in its entirety, including regulations dealing with projecting (sec. 393.87) and shifting or falling (sec. 393.100-393.106) loads. During darkness, vehicles carrying logs that project more than 4 feet from the rear of the vehicle must display a red reflector or reflective paint on the end of the log projecting furthest to the rear.

Crash reports are available from:

Bureau of State Police
Traffic Division
State House Station 20
Augusta , ME 04333
(207) 624-8944

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Maryland Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Bethesda may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Maryland Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Maryland laws that affect trucks operating only in Maryland :

Driver Qualification:

Maryland has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with some modifications. Part 391 does not apply to a farmer in the transportation of supplies or farm products within 150 air miles of the farm.

A driver not meeting the physical qualification requirements may qualify for a waiver. Contact the Motor Vehicle Administration for specifics regarding a waiver possibility.

Parts and Accessories:

Maryland has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations. Factory installed pollution control devices must be maintained in constant operation. It is illegal to disconnect or otherwise interrupt their operation.

Loads:

Maryland has adopted part 393 of the Federal Regulations, including regulations dealing with projecting and shifting or falling loads. All vehicles must be constructed or loaded in a way that prevents any of the load from dropping, sifting, leaking, or otherwise escaping from the vehicle.

Crash reports are available from:

Maryland State Police

Security Annex Central Records Division
1711 Belmont Ave.
Baltimore , MD 21244
(410) 298-3390

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Massachusetts Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Boston may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Massachusetts Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Massachusetts laws that affect trucks operating only in Massachusetts :

Driver Qualification:

Massachusetts has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with some exceptions.  Intrastate drivers are exempt from the 21 year age requirement, from having the ability to fluently read and speak the English language, and from 391.31, pertaining to road tests and written examinations.

A Massachusetts resident may obtain an operators full time license at the age of 18; commercial vehicle operators must be at least 18 years of age.

Driving of Motor Vehicles:

Massachusetts has adopted Part 392 of the Federal Regulations. A driver isn’t allowed to run the engine of a motor vehicle for more than 5 minutes if the vehicle is stopped.

Parts and Accessories:

Massachusetts has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations in its entirety. One notable regulation from Part 393 is that a driver isn’t allowed to operate a motor vehicle unless the vehicle is equipped with a muffler in good working order to prevent excessive or unnecessary noise.

Crash reports are available from:

Registry of Motor Vehicles
Accident Records
P.O. Box 199100

Boston , MA 02119
(617) 351-9434

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Michigan Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Holland may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Michigan Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Michigan laws that affect trucks operating only in Michigan :

Driver Qualification:

Michigan has adopted Part 391 with a few modifications. Farm vehicle drivers are to have a medical examiner’s certificate.

A commercial driver must be at least 18 years old, and must be at least 21 if transporting hazardous materials.

A person who is not physically qualified to drive under Sec. 391.41 may apply for a waiver. A joint application from the driver and motor carrier needs to be made to the motor carrier division of the department of state police.

Parts and Accessories:

Michigan has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations in its entirety. An asphalt hauling vehicle that is required to be equipped with an under-ride guard under this section is exempt from the requirement if the under-ride guard prevents the vehicle from being attached to an asphalt paving machine.

Vehicle Marking/Identification:

Michigan has adopted Sec. 390.21 of the Federal Regulations. All motor trucks or truck tractors more than 5,000 pounds registered weight, and all towing of platform bed wrecker road service vehicles, must have the vehicle marked with the name, city, and state or the registered logo or emblem of the registered owner or lessee of the vehicle.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of State Police
Criminal Justice Information Center
7150 Harris Dr.
Lansing , MI 48913
(517) 322-5531

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Minnesota Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Squaw Lake may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Minnesota Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Minnesota laws that affect trucks operating only in Minnesota :

Parts and Accessories:

Minnesota has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations with one notable difference. Tank trailers and distributor trailers used only for transporting liquid, gaseous, or dry fertilizer and not over 12,000 lb. are not required to have brakes of the truck towing the trailer had brakes capable of meeting Minnesota’s stopping distance requirements.

Inspection and Maintenance:

Minnesota has adopted Part 396 of the Federal Regulations with a few notable differences. Legislation passed in May 1990 requires that an annual inspection be done on commercial motor vehicles registered in Minnesota .

It’s against the law for a driver to operate a commercial motor vehicle unless the vehicle displays an inspection decal issued by a certified inspector or the vehicle carries proof that the vehicle complies with federal motor vehicle inspection requirements for vehicles in interstate commerce.

Daily inspection procedures are similar to the requirements in Sec. 396.11. One modification made was to Section 396.11(d). The exemption applies in Minnesota only to a farm truck that can be driven by a person not holding a commercial driver’s license and a commercial motor vehicle held for resale by a licensed motor vehicle dealer.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Public Safety
Driver & Vehicle Services—Accident Records

445 Minnesota St., Suite 181
St. Paul , MN 55101
(651) 296-2060/3177

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Mississippi Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Biloxi may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Mississippi Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Mississippi laws that affect trucks operating only in Mississippi :

Mississippi has adopted all of the Federal Regulations that apply to all over-the-road trucks with no differences.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Public Safety
Safety Responsibility Bureau
P.O. Box 958
Jackson , MS 39205
(601) 987-1256

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Missouri Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Saint Louis may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Missouri Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Missouri laws that affect trucks operating only in Missouri :

Driver Qualification:

Missouri has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with a few notable differences in age requirement and physical qualification. A driver must be at least 18 years of age to obtain a CDL or Class E license, and at least 21 if transporting hazardous materials. Not all federal physical requirements are applicable to drivers in intrastate commerce, however they are not exempt from the periodic drug testing requirements.

Hours of Service:

Missouri has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with one notable difference. The maximum driving and on-duty requirements don’t apply to intrastate drivers transporting agricultural commodities or farm supplies if the transportation is limited to within a 100-air-mile radius from the source of the commodities or distribution point for the farm supplies when transporting happens during planting and harvesting seasons.

Vehicle Marking/Identification:

Missouri had adopted Sec. 390.21 of the Federal Regulations with one notable exception. Missouri doesn’t regulate or issue DOT numbers to intrastate private carriers.

Crash reports are available from:

Missouri State Highway Patrol
Traffic Division
P.O. box 568

Jefferson City , MO 65102
(573) 526-6113

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Montana Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Helena may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Montana Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Montana laws that affect trucks operating only in Montana :

Driver Qualification:

Montana has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with two notable differences. Intrastate drivers may be as young as 18 years old as long as they are not transporting hazardous materials. Also, waivers of certain physical qualifications may be granted if prescribed criteria are met.

Montana has adopted all other federal laws that apply to all overthe road trucks without further exception.

Crash reports are available from:

Records Bureau
Montana Highway Patrol
2550 Prospect Ave.

P.O. Box 201419
Helena , MT 59604

Accident reports in the state are considered confidential and copies are only released upon receipt of a signed statement from an individual involved in the accident.

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Nebraska Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Falls City may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Nebraska Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Nebraska laws that affect trucks operating only in Nebraska :

Driver Qualification:

Nebraska has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with a few modifications. Part 391 doesn’t apply to drivers of farm trucks operated solely in intrastate commerce.

To drive intrastate, a person must be 18 years old to obtain a Class A license and must be 17 years old to obtain an operator’s license to obtain a Class B or C license. To drive interstate, a person must be 21 years old.

Hours of Service:

Nebraska has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with a few exceptions for intrastate drivers. In Nebraska , a driver will be allowed to drive 12 hours (instead of 10) after having 8 consecutive hours off. A driver may not drive after 16 hours (instead of 15) on duty, after having 8 consecutive off. Drivers will not be permitted to drive after being on duty 70 hours in seven consecutive days or 80 hours in eight consecutive days.

Loads:

Nebraska has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations, including regulations dealing with projecting and shifting or falling loads in its entirety.

Crash reports are available from:

Accident Records Bureau
Highway Safety Section
Department of Roads
Box 94699
Lincoln , NE 68509 -4669
(402) 479-4645

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New Mexico Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Albuquerque may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The New Mexico Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of New Mexico laws that affect trucks operating only in New Mexico :

Driver Qualification:

New Mexico has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with some exceptions. Intrastate drivers hauling hazardous materials requiring placards must be 21; to transport non-hazardous materials, drivers must be 18.

Intrastate drivers regularly employed before June 1, 1990, are not subject to the application for employment, investigators and inquiries, road test, and written test, as long as the driver continues to be regularly employed for that motor carrier.

Hours of Service:

New has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with a few notable differences. One major modification was made to the hours of service requirements for intrastate commerce: the 100-air-mile radius exemption was increased to 150 miles. Also, the maximum driving requirements don’t apply to drivers transporting agricultural commodities or farm supplies if the transportation is limited to a 100 air mile radius from the source of the commodities or farm supplies.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Public Safety
Law Enforcement
Records Bureau
P.O. Box 1628

Santa Fe , NM 87504-1628
(505) 827-0376

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Nevada Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Reno may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Nevada Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Nevada laws that affect trucks operating only in Nevada :

Nevada has adopted all federal laws that apply to all over-the road trucks with no notable differences.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Public Safety
Highway Patrol
555 Wright Way
Carson City , Nevada 89711-0525
(775) 684-4617

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New Hampshire Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Concord may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The New Hampshire Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of New Hampshire laws that affect trucks operating only in New Hampshire :

Driver Qualification:

New Hampshire has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with some exceptions. The minimum age for transporting non-hazardous materials is 18; for hazardous materials, 21. Drivers operating interstate must be 21.

If a person is not physically qualified to drive a commercial motor vehicle due to a physical deficiency, he can seek to have a waiver granted from the state of New Hampshire .

New Hampshire observes all other federal laws that apply to over-the-road truckswithout exception.

Crash reports are available from:

N.H. Department of Safety
Division of Motor Vehicles
Hazen Drive
Concord , NH 03305
Attn: Accident Reports
(603) 271-2506

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New Jersey Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Trenton may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The New Jersey Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of New Jersey laws that affect trucks operating only in New Jersey :

Driver Qualification:

New Jersey has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with two notable exceptions. The 21-year age requirement applies unless a driver is transporting non-hazardous materials. If this is the case, he must be at least 18 years old.

A driver engaged in intrastate commerce not transporting hazardous materials requiring placards, but who is not physically qualified to drive under Section 391.41 (b), may continue to drive a motor vehicle if the driver has a valid New Jersey CDL as of September 20 th, 1993 .

Vehicle Marking/Identification:

New Jersey didn’t adopt Sec. 390.21 of the Federal Regulations for intrastate commerce. Every vehicle used for commercial purposes on a street or highway must in plain view display name of the owner or lessee, and the name of the municipality in which the owner or lessee has his principal place of business.

Crash reports are available from:

Accident Report Request
Operations Department
New Jersey Turnpike Authority
P.O. Box 1121

New Brunswick , NJ 08903
(732) 247-0900

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New York Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Ithaca may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The New York Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of New York laws that affect trucks operating only in New York :

Driving of Motor Vehicles:

New York had adopted Part 392 of the Federal Regulations with some exceptions. Drivers involved in an accident must stop, take precautions to prevent any further accident at the scene, provide necessary information to parties concerned, and report the accident as required.

The use of radar detectors and laser detectors in any commercial vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds is prohibited.

Parts and Accessories:

New York has adopted Pat 393 of the Federal Regulations in their entirety. No one can drive a vehicle on a public highway that emits unnecessary smoke or unnecessary offensive vapors.

Loads:

New York has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations, including regulations dealing with projecting and shifting or falling.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Motor Vehicles
Accident Records Bureau
Swan Street Building , 4 th Floor
Empire State Plaza
Albany , NY 12228
(518) 474-076

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North Carolina Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Charlotte may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The North Carolina Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of North Carolina laws that affect trucks operating only in North Carolina :

Driver Qualification:

North Carolina has adopted Part 391 with two notable differences. If an intrastate driver is not transporting hazardous materials, he may be as young as 18. Also, drivers that don’t meet the physical requirements to operate a motor vehicle in North Carolina may attempt to obtain a waiver from the state.

Hours of Service:

North Carolina has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with one exemption of note. An intrastate motor carrier driver can’t drive more that 12 hours following 8 consecutive hours off-duty; or for any period after having been on duty 16 hours following 8 consecutive hours off duty. A driver can’t drive after having been on duty 70 hours in 7 consecutive days, or 80 hours in 8 consecutive days. An intrastate driver will be determined by his previous 7 days of operation.

Accident Reporting:

North Carolina has adopted the entirety of 49 CFR 390. A truck company must report any significant accident immediately to local law enforcement, within 24 hours to the Public Service Commission if a fatal crash or 15 days if non-fatal, and also within 30 days to the Director of Public Safety.

Crash reports are available from:

Division of Motor Vehicles
Traffic Records Section
3105 Mail Service Center
Raleigh , NC 27699

(919) 861-3098

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North Dakota Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Fargo may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The North Dakota Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of North Dakota laws that affect trucks operating only in North Dakota :

Driver Qualification:

North Dakota has adopted Part 391 of the Federal regulations with alterations to the age requirement and medical waivers. The minimum age for drivers of vehicles in intrastate operations is 18. Younger drivers may drive farm vehicles if certain criteria are followed.

Hours of Service:

North Dakota has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with a few notable differences. An intrastate driver who drives a truck that has a manufacturer’s gross vehicle weight rating of 26,000 pounds or less and isn’t transporting hazardous materials is not subject to the hours of service regulations. Also, an intrastate driver can’t drive more than 12 hours following 8 consecutive hours off duty or for any period after having been on duty more than 15 hours. A driver can’t drive after having been on duty 70 hours in 7 consecutive days.

Accident Reporting:

North Dakota has adopted Part 390 of the Federal Regulations, which includes accident record keeping requirements.

Crash reports are available from:

Drivers License and Traffic Safety Division
608 E. Boulevard Ave.
Bismark , ND 58505-0700
(701) 328-2600

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Ohio Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Bath may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Ohio Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Ohio laws that affect trucks operating only in Ohio :

Driver Qualification:

Ohio has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with some exceptions. Intrastate drivers must be at least 18 years old, a deviation from the 21-year-old age requirement. Also, a person driving a truck on or before December 7, 1988 who doesn’t meet a medical requirement may be eligible for provisional medical certification if he’s not transporting hazardous materials.

Hours of Service:

Ohio has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with a few modifications. For example, a driver driving for a private motor carrier and transporting construction materials intrastate are allowed to drive for 12 hours (instead of 10) following 8 consecutive hours off duty. He can’t drive after being on duty for 16 hours (instead of 15) following 8 consecutive hours off duty.

Vehicle Marking/Identification:

Ohio doesn’t apply Sec. 390.21 of the Federal Regulations to intrastate vehicles. All intrastate vehicles subject to the rules have to have the company name, city and state, and company vehicle number displayed on both sides in contrasting letter at least two inches in height and 3/8 th inch in width. Company vehicle numbers should be consecutive and should be retired with the vehicle.

Crash reports are available from:

State Highway Patrol
Central Records Section, 1 st Floor
P.O. Box 182074
Columbus , OH 43218
(614) 752-1593

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Oklahoma Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Oklahoma City may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Oklahoma City Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Oklahoma laws that affect trucks operating only in Oklahoma :

Driver Qualification:

Oklahoma has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with some modifications. A driver in intrastate commerce must be at least 18 years old; 21 years old for the transportation of hazardous waste materials in a quantity requiring placarding or marking.

Hours of Service:

Oklahoma has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations. However, 12 hours of driving time is allowed if the vehicle is engaged solely in intrastate commerce and is not hauling hazardous materials required to be marked or placarded.

To request relief from the hours of service regulations in an emergency, drivers should contact the Troop Commander, Department of Public Safety.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Public Safety
Records Management Division
P.O. Box 11415

Oklahoma City , OK 73136

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Oregon Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Salem may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Oregon Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Oregon laws that affect trucks operating only in Oregon :

Driver Qualification:

Oregon has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with two notable differences. Those who drive for private carriers and drive trucks under 26,000 pounds are exempt for the provisions of Part 391, unless transporting hazardous materials in a quantity that requires marking or placarding of the vehicle.

Intrastate drivers must be 18. Interstate drivers must be 21.

The Oregon Department of Transportation may issue a waiver of physical disqualification for intrastate operations.

Hours of Service:

Oregon has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with a few notable exceptions. For example, Public and telecommunications utilities are exempt from Part 395 when providing or restoring services under an emergency.

Crash reports are available from:

*Oregon Department of Transportation
Transportation Development Division
Crash Analysis and Reporting Unit

555 13 th St. NE
Salem , OR 97301
(503) 986-35607

*Copies of an individual’s Oregon Traffic Accident and Insurance Report are not available to persons not directly involved in the accident in question.

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Pennsylvania Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Reading may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Pennsylvania Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Pennsylvania laws that affect trucks operating only in Pennsylvania :

Driver Qualification:

Pennsylvania has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with a few modifications. The age limit was altered: in Pennsylvania , a driver may be as young as 18 years old if he’s not transporting hazardous waste. Otherwise, he must be at least 21. Also, a driver who does not meet the physical qualifications to operate a commercial motor vehicle in Pennsylvania may apply for a waiver from the state.

Vehicle Marking/Identification:

Pennsylvania hasn’t adopted Sec. 390.21 of the Federal Regulations for intrastate operation. Intrastate vehicles under the jurisdiction of the Public Utility Commission, however, are subject to any applicable vehicle identification requirements issued by that agency.

Loads:

Pennsylvania has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations, including regulations dealing with projecting and shifting or falling. In addition to the Federal Regulations, see 67 Pennsylvania Code Sec. 231.209 for requirements regarding projecting loads.

Crash reports are available from:

Crash Reports Unit
Bureau of Records and Identification
Pennsylvania State Police
1800 Elmerton Ave.
Harrisburg , PA 17110-9758
(717) 783-5516

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Rhode Island Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Providence may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Rhode Island Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Rhode Island laws that affect trucks operating only in Rhode Island :

Driver Qualification:

Rhode Island has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with one notable modification. Drivers must be 21, except intrastate drivers that do not transport hazardous materials are allowed to drive at age 18.

How to obtain crash reports:

A copy of an official accident report (investigated by the state police) can be obtained by sending a written request with the required fee to the State Police Headquarters. Your request must include the name of those involved and date and location of the accident.

Crash reports are available from:

Rhode Island State Police
Accident Report Office
311 Danielson Pike
North Scituate , RI 02857
(401) 444-1143

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South Carolina Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Charleston may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The South Carolina Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of South Carolina laws that affect trucks operating only in South Carolina :

Driver Qualification:

South Carolina has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with one modification to the age requirement: 18 years intrastate, 21 years interstate. In federal law, the minimum age is 21.

Hours of Service:

South Carolina has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with one notable difference. Intrastate drivers for motor carriers can’t drive more than 12 hours (instead of 10) following 8 consecutive hours off duty.

South Carolina adopted the remainder of the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks without further exception.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Public Safety
Financial Responsibility
P.O. Box 1498
Columbia , SC 29216

(803) 737-4000

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South Dakota Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Pierre may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The South Dakota Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of South Dakota laws that affect trucks operating only in South Dakota :

Driver Qualification:

South Dakota has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with some modifications on the age requirement. An intrastate driver not transporting hazardous materials can be as young as 16, rather than 21. All drivers transporting hazardous materials must be at least 21.

Hours of Service:

South Dakota has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with one notable exception. The maximum driving and on-duty requirements can’t apply to intrastate transporters of agricultural commodities or farm supplies if the transportation is limited to an area within a 100-air-mile radius from the source of the commodities or farm supplies when such transportation occurs during planting and harvesting seasons.

Loads:

South Dakota has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations dealing with projecting and shifting or falling in its entirety.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Public Safety
Office of Accident Records
700 E. Broadway
Pierre , SD 57501-2586
(605) 773-5275

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Tennessee Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Tennessee may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Tennessee Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Tennessee laws that affect trucks operating only in Tennessee :

Driver Qualification:

Tennessee has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with some modifications. A driver must be 21 years of age. However, a driver may obtain a Class A license at age 19 if no special endorsements are required, the vehicle is operated within 100 miles of the job, and the driver is solely intrastate. A driver may obtain a Class B license at age 18 if the above conditions are met.

Parts and Accessories:

Tennessee has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations. Semi-trailers less than 1,500 lbs. gross weight need not have breaks, otherwise federal standards apply.

Loads:

Tennessee has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations, including regulations dealing with projecting and shifting or falling in its entirety.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Safety
1150 Foster Ave.
Nashville , TN 37249-4000

(615) 741-3954

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Texas Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Austin may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Texas Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Texas laws that affect trucks operating only in Texas :

Driver Qualification:

Texas has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with a few notable modifications. For example, a commercial operator must be at least 18 years of age, rather than 21. Also, Sec. 391.11(b)(1), regarding reading and speaking the English language, was not adopted for intrastate drivers, however the driver must have successfully passed the examination for a Texas driver’s license.

Drivers with certain disabilities require the approval of a medical examiner before a license can be issued.

Hours of Service:

Texas has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with a few exceptions for intrastate drivers. The maximum driving and on-duty requirements can’t apply to drivers transporting agricultural commodities or farm supplies in intrastate commerce within a 150-air-mile radius from the source of the commodities or supplies when such transportation occurs during planting and harvesting seasons.

Parts and Accessories:

Texas has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations with exceptions for the breaks and rear bumper. However, this section is not applicable to vehicles manufactured prior to September 1, 1991 .

Crash reports are available from:

Texas Department of Public Safety
Accident Records
P.O. Box 4087
(512) 424-7121

Austin , TX 78773

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Utah Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Salt Lake City may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Utah Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Utah laws that affect trucks operating only in Utah :

Driver Qualifications:

Utah has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with some modifications. Drivers must be 18 years of age unless they are hauling hazardous materials, in which case they must be at least 21. Federal regulations mandate that all drivers be at least 21 under all circumstances. Also, in order to be granted a Class A, B. or C license, an applicant must have at least one year’s driving experience.

Hours of Service:

Utah has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with one modification. When a driver primarily transports construction materials and equipment to and from an active construction site, any period of 7 or 8 consecutive days may end with the beginning of any off-duty period of 36 or more successive hours.

Inspection and Maintenance:

Utah has adopted Part 396 of the Federal Regulations in its entirety.

Crash reports are available from:

Driver’s License Division
Attention: Archives
P.O. Box 30560
Salt Lake City , UT 84130-0560

(801) 965-4428

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Vermont Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Montpelier may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Vermont Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Vermont laws that affect trucks operating only in Vermont :

Driver Qualifications:

Vermont has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with a fewnoteworthy modifications. Commercial motor vehicle drivers must be at least 18 years old. In order to transport radioactive materials, a driver must have at least 3 years of experience driving the type of vehicle associated with the transport.

The drug testing regulations in Part 391 were not adopted. Intrastate characters who would like to establish a drug testing program for drivers can do so as long as the program is established utilizing current statutory guidelines.

Vermont has adopted the remainder of federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks without exception.

Crash reports are available from:

Agency of Transportation
Department of Motor Vehicles
State Street

Montpelier , VT 05603-0001
(802) 828-2078

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Virginia Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Reston may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Virginia Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Virginia laws that affect trucks operating only in Virginia :

Driver Qualification:

Virginia has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with some exceptions. For example, the minimum age requirement for a person to hold an intrastate commercial driver’s license is 18. A minimum age of 21 is the federal law. Also, all licenses issued, other than a Commercial Driver’s License, will be issued without classification (except for motorcycle or Class M).

Hours of Service:

Virginia has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with one notable difference. The maximum driving and on-duty requirements can’t apply to intrastate transporters of agricultural commodities or farm supplies if the transportation is limited to an area within a 100-air-mile radius from the source of the commodities or farm supplies when such transportation occurs during planting and harvesting seasons.

Inspection and Maintenance:

Virginia has adopted Part 396 of the Federal Regulations in it’s entirety with no differences.

Crash reports are available from:

Department of Motor Vehicles
Customer Records Division
P.O. Box 27412
Richmond , VA 23269
(866) 368-5463 (toll free)

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Washington Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Seattle may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Washington Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Washington laws that affect trucks operating only in Washington :

Driver Qualification:

Washington has adopted Part 391 with some exceptions. For example, intrastate drivers may be at least 18 years of age, instead of 21. Also, as of June 13, 2002 , all breath alcohol technicians and medical review officers must report all people holding a Washington state commercial driver’s license who have a confirmed positive drug or alcohol test to the Washington Department of Licensing within three business days of the test.

Hours of Service:

The Washington State patrol has adopted federal regulations regarding hours of service with certain exceptions for logging, dump truck, and agricultural operations. For example, an intrastate driver who is hauling logs or is driving a dump truck, or a driver who is hauling agricultural products from the point of production on farms, isn’t permitted to drive more than 12 hours following 8 consecutive hours off duty.

Parts and Accessories:

Washington has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations in its entirety. A backup alert device or rear cross-view mirrors must be mounted on a truck with a cube-style, walk-in cargo box up to 18 feet long.

Crash reports are available from:

Washington State Patrol
Collision Records Section
P.O. Box 42628
Olympia , WA 98504-2628

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West Virginia Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Point Pleasant may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The West Virginia Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of West Virginia laws that affect trucks operating only in West Virginia :

Driver Qualification:

West Virginia has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with some modifications. For example, a driver is permitted to drive a heavy truck in intrastate operations already at the age of 18, rather than 21.

Hours of Service:

West Virginia has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with one notable difference. The maximum driving and on-duty requirements doesn’t apply to intrastate transporters of agricultural commodities or farm supplies if the driver remains within a 100-air-mile radius from the source of the commodities or supplies during planting and harvesting seasons.

Parts and Accessories:

West Virginia has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations with one notable difference. A first aid kit is required in intrastate wrecker trucks.

Crash reports are available from:

West Virginia State Police
Traffic Records Section
725 Jefferson Road
South Charleston , WV 25309

(304) 746-2191

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Wisconsin Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in West Allis may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Wisconsin Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Wisconsin laws that affect trucks operating only in Wisconsin :

Driver Qualification:

Wisconsin has adopted Part 391 with a few notable differences. A driver must be at least 18 years of age, rather than 21. The physical qualification requirements also contain special provisions. A grandfather provision was established for intrastate drivers who have met state medical qualifications and have been issued a valid Wisconsin commercial driver’s license prior to July 29, 1996, which has not been revoked or cancelled, and who continue to meet state medical requirements

Driving of Motor Vehicles:

Wisconsin has adopted Part 392 of the Federal Regulations with the exception of Sec. 392.16 (use of seatbelts).

Hours of Service:

Wisconsin interstate drivers must follow Part 395 of the Federal Regulations. The state did not adopt Part 395 for intrastate drivers, however, and established separate hours of service requirements. For example, drivers aren’t permitted to drive more than 12 hours following 8 consecutive hours off duty. Also, a driver isn’t permitted to drive after having been on duty 70 hours in 7 consecutive days or 80 hours in 8 consecutive days.

Parts and Accessories:

Wisconsin has adopted Part 393 of the Federal Regulations with a few notable differences. Mudflaps, for example, are not required on vehicles or semi-trailers equipped with dump bodies.

Crash reports are available from:

Division of Motor Vehicles
Traffic Accident Section
P.O. Box 7919
Madison , WI 53707
(608) 266-8753

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Wyoming Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Cheyenne may own a truck that only makes in-state deliveries.

The Wyoming Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of Wyoming laws that affect trucks operating only in Wyoming :

Driver Qualification:

Wyoming has adopted Part 391 of the Federal Regulations with one notable difference. Drivers must be at least 18 years old, not 21.

Hours of Service:

Wyoming has adopted Part 395 of the Federal Regulations with one modification: Drivers hauling non-hazardous materials within a 150 air mile radius of the normal work reporting location are exempt from the logging requirements of Sec. 395.8.

Wyoming has adopted the remainder of the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks without further modification.

Crash reports are available from:

Wyoming Department of Transportation
Division of Driver Licensing
5300 Bishop Blvd.
Cheyenne , WY 82009

(307) 777-4450

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D.C. Truck Accidents

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (Title 49, Parts 350-399) govern all vehicles engaged in interstate traffic.

There are some situations where a tractor-trailer or other commercial motor vehicle is involved in only intrastate travel. For example, an appliance store in Georgetown may own a truck that only makes deliveries within the district.

The District of Columbia Department of Public Safety has adopted Title 49, Parts 382-384 and 390-399 of the federal regulations.

If you want to learn about the federal laws that apply to all over-the-road trucks, click here.

The following provisions are an overview of District of Columbia laws that affect trucks operating only in the District of Columbia :

The District of Columbia has adopted all Federal Regulations with no exceptions.

Crash reports are available from:

Metropolitan Police Department
Public Documents Section
Room 3075
300 Indiana Ave., N.W.
Washington , DC 20001
(202) 727-4357

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